Monday, October 7, 2013

Fish Bowl #7, Chapters 22 and 23 of The Kite Runner

Welcome to your seventh fish bowl!

A few reminders if you're looking for an A for the day:


(A) Bring at least one quotation and/or page reference into at least one of your responses.
(B) Explain your thinking thoughtfully and thoroughly (try to avoid the one-sentence response).
(C) Keep it professional, including the usage of proper grammar and spelling.
(D) Comment frequently from the beginning of the conversation to the end.


Remember also that you're welcome to get into a hot seat in the inner circle for a little while and earn some of your daily participation points there.


Enjoy!

164 comments:

  1. On page 281 we find out that one of the Taliban is Assef. Were you surprised? Did you see this coming? How would you have reacted if you were Amir?

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    1. I am not surprised at all that the Taliban is Assef. He has been evil throughout the whole book and this is totally something he would do. If I were Amir I would be startled but not that surprised. I would be really scared because, Amir does know w hat Assef is capable of and the things he has done in the past are really scary things. I would also be really mad and I would probably fight him just like Amir did to kinda get back at Assef for not only being the Taliban but also things that have happened in the past.

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    2. I was very surprised when I heard that Assef was a Talib. If I were Amir I would have not have handled myself as well as he had. I would have like yelled in screamed at him, but now in these days where he could kill anybody in the blink of an eye.

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    3. I am not surprised that Assef is a part of the Taliban. He has always been deranged in the head and does so much evil. If I was Amir I would be angry that Assef hasn't stopped being evil throughout all of these years.

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    4. I think that it gave Amir an advantage. Amir now knows part of the "enemies" history. He also knows how his temper is. On page 287 when Assef pulled out his steel knuckles it hinted that the enemy was more predictable than we, the readers, thought.

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    5. i was very surprised because i was expecting him to be dead. if i where amir i would act the same way he did. he acted fairly calm even know he wasn't calm what so ever in the inside.

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    6. I wasn't that surprised just because of Assef's background. He wasn't that good of a kid so I can see why he would be a Taliban. I did see this coming because on page 280, it says, "The man's hand slid up and down the boy's belly. Up and down, slowly, gently." This line somewhat foreshadows that it is Assef because of the rape of Hassan earlier in the book. If I was Amir, I would have been both surprised and terrified because for Amir, I doubt he thought he would ever encounter Assef again in his life and it just took him by surprise.

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    7. Although I was a little surprised he returned in the book, I wasn't surprised to find Assef involved with a group like the Taliban. Looking back to page 40 Assef says "Afghanistan for Pashtuns, i say. That's my vision." From the beginning Assef has been violent and had thoughts of riding the land of a certain group. If I was Amir I would have been surprised in the moment and caught off guard.

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    8. I was surprised that it was Assef at first, but after I thought about it was not surprising at all. It was unpredictable, but it made sense. Assef had always looked up to Hitler and how he had gotten rid of almost all Jews in Germany, and Assef wanted to do the same with the Hazaras in Afghanistan. So it made sense that he would be the leader of the cause, but it was also surprising sense we hadn't seen him since the first few chapters of the book.

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  2. Why do you think Assef chose to dress Sohrab in like a jesters clown suit?

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    1. I think Assef chose that because it makes a joke out of him and dresses him how Assef sees him.

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    3. I think it shows that Assef sees him as a joke and not powerful.

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    4. I agree with Lindsay I think Assef chose a jester costume to portray that powerful and authoritative characteristic that the book has portrayed him to have. Assef has come across as thinking he is powerful and that whatever he says goes. No one would ever dress in a jester costume on their own terms or against their own will but by having Sohrab in a jester costume it shows that Assef controlled Sohrab to wear that, and that Sohrab was so intimidated by Assef that he couldn't say no. He did it to show his power and mock Sohrab for who and what he is. A hazara.

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    5. I believe that Assef was trying to show his power and how far he had come. He had always had some sense of power just in how he would come off, but as he continued to grow older and became the leader of the Taliban, now he had much more authority and power and this was just another way of showing this.

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  3. If you were in the position of Sohrab and a stranger came to get you from the Taliban's house how would you feel? Would you go with someone that you don't know?

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    1. At that point, I think I would take any option to escape.

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    2. Well doesn't he know that Amir is his uncle? But even then anywhere would be better than getting sexually abused every single day. think he wanted to also because if he didn't shoot out Assef's eye then he would stayed there forever and Amir would've died.

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    3. I agree with Joseph because if you didn't know who it was and what was going on, I would look for anywhere to escape because you don't know what the person is going to do to you.

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    4. I would be so happy to leave with a stranger considering the conditions I was in. I would be so scared and having to live not knowing if you are gonna get killed or being in really dangerous conditions I would be happy to leave even if it was with a stranger. I would be a little bit antitheses just because, I don't think I would have a lot of trust for people after living the way Sorhab has lived but I'm sure he would be happy to leave.

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    5. Personally, I would go with anyone in order to escape. It's better than risking your life.

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    6. If a man is willing to come in and risk his life for this boy that he has never met then yeah I think I would go with him, and it's a away to get away from the torturer and rape that Assef has put him through.

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    7. Sohrab was obviously scared and all alone, because as far as he knew he had no family left, and no one who cared about him. While being at the Taliban, he had no reason to expect that anyone would come to save him, and all he could do was let Assef and the Taliban harass him, because if he fought back the consequences could have been much worse. So when Amir came to rescue him, I think he enjoyed the comfort and it was like a ray of light in his world of dark shadows.

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  4. On pg. 302 when it states, "Amir the socially legitimate half, the half that represented the riches he had inherited and the sin with impunity privileges that came with them". What sins do you think they are talking about? How do you inherited a sin? Can Amir get forgiven for his sin?

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    1. I think that the sins that they are talking about are all the sins that Amir "did" to Hassan. You inherit a sin by doing something that is morally wrong. I think that Amir can get forgiven for his sin but I don't think he will ever forget what he did.

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    2. When you inherit a sin it's not really your fault or what you do, you can be labeled for a sin that a family member did simply. You may not be the person that committed the sin but you are directly related to them which some people see as having the same traits, like my cousins mom is in jail for a lot of bad decisions that she's made and her kids and sometimes even me and my brother get a reputation from her even though we had nothing to do with what she did. We inherited her sins even though we didn't commit them. Amir can be forgiven for his sin but no matter what everyone involved will always have the thought of what Amir did. like the quote not from the book "Forgive but never forget"

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  5. Why did Sohrab defend Amir if he didn't know who he was? Did he just think what Assef was doing was wrong?

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    1. I think Soharb defended Amir because he thought it was the right thing to do because this man is here to help and or because his father may have spoken of him and Soharb thought it would be the right thing to do in honor of his father.

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    2. I think that Sohrab defended Amir because he didn't know him and he has a good heart to protect whoever. He defended him even though he didn't know him which shows great bravery and courage. Sohrab may have thought Assef was doing wrong because he was helping Amir not Assef.

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    3. I feel like Sohrab knew that Assef was doing something wrong and knows that Assef is a bad person. If Assef is fighting off someone, there has to be a reason why the bad Assef is fighting someone. I would think that person is good.

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    4. I think Sohrab defended Amir because he knew how bad Assef was, and what he was capable of,and he knew that Amir wanted to rescue him, so he probably thought Amir was a good guy to come this way and fight Assef for him.

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    5. i think sohrab defended amir because he knew that amir was trying to help him or thought he was anyway. he also probably wanted revenge on assef for the thing he did and probably he knew that what assef was doing was just plain wrong.

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  6. On page 275, Amir thinks to himself, "But when a coward stops remembering who he is...God help him." What do you think he means by this?

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    1. I think Amir is so lost and scared at this point and he knows he's not going to be a coward this time around but, growing up he was a coward so it's different to him. And he is ready to save Sorhab but he needs God by his side because he has never fought someone so powerful and scary before. So he knows he is going to do it but he needs the help of God to help him get through it.

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    2. I think this means that Amir thinks of himself as a coward he has refereed to him self as a coward his entire life and now that he is doing this he might think he is not that big of coward anymore. So God help him is probably like this person no longer truly knows who they are anymore and they are going to need lots of guidance.

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  7. On page 289, Amir is getting beat up by Assef. Do you think that when Amir was getting beat up by Assef, do you think it makes up for Hassan's incident?

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    1. I doubt anything could make up for what happened to Hassan. But I feel that by Assef beating up Hassan he feels that he is somewhat forgiven and that he is finally getting what he deserves for what happened.

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    2. I feel it is almost like a punishment for not stepping in. But then also I feel that Amir is Hassan in the alleyway and Sohrab is Amir in that position. I like how Sohrab stood up for Amir and stepped in and actually did something and not just watched and did nothing. And this almost shows what could've happened if Amir would've stepped in and stopped assef from raping Hassan that their lives would've been better off.

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    3. I agree with Jessa. To me, Amir getting beat up is his redemption from what happened to Hassan. From now on, he is redeemed from the guilt he has suffered with from the day Assef raped Hassan.

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    4. Personally i believe that the two incidents have nothing to do with each other. Nothing amir can do will make up for what happened to hassan, but hassan didn't have the chance to save amir, like amir had the chance to save hassan.

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    5. on page 289 he does tell you that he does feel healed and redeemed. but if that where me i wouldn't feel redeemed, i would feel as bad because assef gone both battles and didn't get what he deserved. i thought he should have gotten a lot worse of a punishment.

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  8. Do you think that there is any significance to the fact that all that really stands out to Amir while talking to the doctor is "The impact had cut your upper lip in two, he had said, clean down the middle. Clean down the middle. Like a harelip." Explain your thinking.

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    1. Yes, the fact that Amir now has a harelip is similar to a symbol of forgiveness. Amir is now in the place of Hassan, he is the one injured by Assef, he is the one that is suffering. It adds a deep sense of Irony to the Kite Runner.

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    2. It does show significance to the fact that Amir looks like he has a hairlip. It represents what affect Hassan really had on Amir. That Amir remembers it from this day and time. It seems like he misses him and has so many memories of him.

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    3. Of course there is a significance to the injuries which caused him to have a harelip because that was a major characteristic to Hassan which is very important to Amir.

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  9. When Amir is talking to Assef and he brings out Sohrab and he is being really sexual with him, like placing him in between his legs, biting his ear, rubbing his stomach things like that, Why do you think he was doing that? Is it just because he's a cruel awful person or because he knows that Amir saw him rape Hassan and wants to break him?

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    1. I think he knew that Amir saw what he did to Hassan, and wanted to make Amir remember that moment, and bring back those painful memories.

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  10. On page 275, Amir says, "But when a coward stops remembering who he is ...God help him." what do you think Amir means by that? Is he calling himself a coward?

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    1. Amir means that he knows he is a coward already, but if he forgets why he is a coward, he is just a bad person. They are saying he needs God's help because they will forever live like a coward, without reason.

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  11. I was very surprised because we heard about him so long ago and then all of the sudden he is back so yea i was surprised. If i was Amir I would have jumped out of skin and would have started to freak out because someone you uses to be so scared of reappeared and now you have to face him again so I would have freaked out.

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  12. The significance of Sohrab shooting Assef's eye with a sling shot is that Sohrab is so much like his father, and Hassan would do the same thing. I believe it is almost like Hassan is "reborn" in his son. This is also proven with Hassan would always stand up for Amir, so his son doing the same is just a very deep impact.

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  14. I think that when Sohrab shot out Assef's eye was to defend Amir because he knew that Assef was doing something bad and he wanted to protect Amir. I also think it was a sliver of comic relief in the story like when Hassan said I will shoot your eye out and then they will call you one eyed Assef. It gave a little relief from the story and also trying it to Hassan and Amir's friendship.

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  15. On page 281 we find out that one of the Taliban is Assef. Why do you think Assef is so evil and keeps doing these horrible things throughout the book?

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    1. There is always that one character in the book that plays the bad guy and represents all the negative parts in the book and I think that is Assef. Not only does Assef exhibit evil qualities as an individual in this book, but Assef always shows the negative and evil times that Afghanistan is going through at this time. Assef is helpful in representing how evil and destructive and murderous Afghanistan was at this time. He is the symbolism for Afghanistan not just a teenage and adult bully.

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    2. Because in every book with a hero you have to have an evil person and someone that is willing to risk everything to kill people and become the most powerful man.

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  16. What do you think the symbolism is of the author portraying Sohrab to be a braver individual than Amir, just like his father Hassan?

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    1. I think the symbolism in that is that Sohrab is taking after his father Hassan and being brave. And it kinda shows the next chapter in their life, because they worked together to fight off Assef and from this point on they are going to work together as a team and Amir is going to be taking care of Sohrab even though it may take them a while to have a connections hopefully at some point they will and it just shows that they can get through anything together.

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    2. I think it shows how the heroism that Hassan obtained have definitely been passed down to his son and I think that Amir knows this. Hassan was always so humble and meek throughout his entire life and I know that Sohrab got these similar qualities from his father.

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  17. When Sohrab shoots Assef's eye out on page 291 I think it is very symbolic. When he shoots his eye out it reminds me of the saying an eye for an eye. He is taking something from Assef after all that Assef has taken from him.

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  18. Do you think that Amir sees Hassan when he looks at Sohrab sees his friend and the person he grew up with?

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    1. Yes, Amir also sees a second chance. A chance to treat Hassan (Sohrab) right. This is shown on page 306, when Amir asks to be Sohrab's friend. He says that he was not a very good friend to Hassan, and shows that he would like to redeem himself with Sohrab.

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    2. I think that Amir sees many of the qualities that he saw in Hassan. Like the humility and courage that they both attained. This probably brings back memories that those two shared while they were children.

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  19. I think that I kind of expected Assef to be part of the Taliban because of what he did to Hassan. We find this out on page 281, and I think this is significant because it's weird to think that he is part of the Taliban. I can see him being a part of the Taliban because he was a "bad" person from the start.

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  20. On page 291, Sohrab refuses to put the slingshot down and shoots Assef in the eye. Exactly like his father he shows a sign of bravery. What does it take for a person to grow up happy and have the strength to willingly stand up to someone stronger than them?

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    1. I think that it takes knowing about all the times people have shown they are stronger than them. In Sohrab's case, Assef had had him in basically a jester's costume with bells tied to his ankles and I think he was just physically and mentally done with how Assef was treating him and all that had happened gave him the strength and courage to stand up to Assef.

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  21. on page 296. "your spleen had ruptured, probably-and fortunately for you-a delayed rupture, because you had signs of early hemorrhage into your abdominal cavity." How could he have gotten that beat up? Does this relate to what happened in chapter 7?

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  22. How do you think Sohrab is feeling after being taken away from Assef? On page 298, Amir said "We have never been properly introduced,I said I offered him my hand. I'm Amir. You are the Amir agha Father told me about?" What is Sohrab thinking after finally meeting the Amir agha his father has told him about?

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    1. Sohrab probably feels relieved to meet someone that his father has told him about and knew. Before Amir came, Sohrab probably felt all alone, like no one in the world cared about him and knew who he was, and knowing that someone does, and came to take care of him, changed Sohrab and made him very happy and relieved.

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    2. After Sohrab was taken away he probably felt very uncomfortable not knowing who he was with or where he will go, but at this point he probably will go anywhere as long as Assef is not there. When Sohrab heard that he was the Amir his dad talked about, it made him feel more comfortable with him, it made him feel more safe. Then on page 306 it says, "I put my hand on his arm, gingerly, but he flinched." This quote shows that Sohrab is still scared when people touch him. Assef left a mark on Sohrab. So Sohrab won't feel comfortable enough with Amir until Assef starts to fade.

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  23. On page 291, Soharb shoots Assef's eye out. What do you think is significant about this, and why is it symbolic?

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    1. I think the symbolism is very strong here, it has many meanings depending on the point of view. The one that I believe is the strongest is he uses a sling shot and that's what Hassan would have used and I think he shoot the same eye as he said he would shot. So this makes it into a deeper connection to his past.

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    2. This will not only effect Assef's life in a physical way like not being able to see depth or ever drive a car again but it may make Assef rethink the way of life he is living. I there really ever "a way to be good again" (pg 310)?

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  25. I think that Rahim Kahn made a smart move to lie to Amir about the American family so Amir can still have a connection with Hassan and pay off his debt to Hassan and finally feel freed from his burden all those years ago in the alley. I also think that Amir needs a child to give him peace and happiness.

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  26. Why does Sorab want to get away from Amir? Or why does he want to be isolated from Amir? could this be a connection to what happened with Hassan?

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    1. Sohrab is obviously traumatized after his stay with Assef, seen when Sohrab flinches away from Amir's touch on 306. He does not know if he can trust others again. Sohrab needs help to recover from his horrible experience.

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    2. I think that Sohrab is just at a very unstable point in his life. He saw his family get killed and then was taken away from his home. He doesn't know who to trust anymore because of all that is happening to him. So how could you expect him to warm up to Amir and trust him after only knowing him for a short period of time.

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  27. Do you think that Rahim's letter helped Amir or hurt him more? Like did it make him feel better about everything or just fill him with more regret?

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    1. I think that it served as motivation. While it may have upset Amir or brought up conflicting emotions i think that it was Rahim's Reminder to Amir what he needs to make up for.

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  28. On page 282, Assef asks if Amir is thirsty, after Amir says no, Assef says "I think you're thirsty." Why is this? Could he have maybe been trying to poison Amir? Or possibly drug him? There are quite a few things this could have been trying to lead to.

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    1. I would not be surprised if Assef tries to poison or drug him because Assef is very evil which he will have no trouble with Amir.

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    2. I think that he is just saying it in that tone like, "I'm right and you're wrong." I think that Assef was just trying to prove that he has more power over Amir.

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  29. Page 310: "A way to be good again.."
    This was one of Amirs personal thoughts why do you think that the author decided to put emphasis on this particular statement? Do you think that it has significance again further on in the book? Do you think that getting the boy is the end of his quest or do you think that the plot twists and turns further making more conflict?

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  30. Will Amir tell Sohrab about who he really is, like his uncle, and tell him the story about why he wanted him so badly and was willing to take a terrible beating and possibly die for a boy that he's never met?

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  31. How is Sohrab's past going to effect his future? Will he be able to have an average life? Or will he be scared of everyone? I think he will heal, but only when he gets older and the memories fade.

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    1. I think if Sohrab is put into a good and happy place it will be very easy to forget his past and move on with life and live a happy normal life. If he is left in a place like Afghan he will not adjust and will distance himself a lot.

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    2. Sohrab's past will effect his future. It will effect it in good and bad ways, he will now know all the horrible things/people out in the world. I think over time he will get to have his average life back, but the memories will still be there. They may fade a little, but he will always remember. Also, Hassan went through a hard childhood, but came out as a great adult with a wife and kid.

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  32. When Amir stood up to Assef, even though he got his but whooped, do you think that just finally being able to fight for what he wants help him get over what he has done and help him find himself or redeem himself?

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    1. The fact that Amir fights for what he wants, but also the fact that he feels he is getting what he deserves. Receiving this punishment has a silver lining, because Amir can now start to forgive himself.

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    2. I think Amir is standing up to Amir and finally getting the chance to fight back to Assef like he wished he could of stood up to Assef in the alley. This is finally his chance to get back at Assef for all of the pain he has caused so may people.

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  33. On page 305 it Farid says, "For you a thousand times over." After he said this Amir broke down. How does this relate back to Amir's childhood? What caused him to break down?

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    1. In his past, Hassan said that to him. It brings painful memories back. Flashbacks almost.

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    2. "For you a thousand times over." Takes Amir back to his childhood with Hassan because Hassan said the same thing. I think this is a powerful connection because Amir remembers the happy past and can feel safe. When Amir breaks down, this memory will help him get back up.

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    3. I feel like this saying brings back powerful memories from his childhood and obviously from Hassan. Amir breaks down because he knows how much Hassan envied Amir and how Hassan would do anything for Amir.

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    4. I think this just flashes back to Amir and Hassan's childhood and how good of a friend Hassan always was to Amir and now Amir is finally getting the chance to do a good deed in return by helping Hassan's son Sohrab.

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  34. I know that Amir needs Baba more than ever, but how can Amir handle this on his own? Does he think/believe Baba is going to help him and take down Assef and possibly the Taliban?

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  35. In these chapter we find out that Assef is a Taliban official does that surprise you ? Could we see this coming?

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    1. This does not surprise me at all because he has always been the evil character and now he has joined the opposing side. The Taliban has always been an evil group so it works together, Assef is mean and so is the Taliban.

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    2. I did see this coming. As a child Assef inflicted such pain upon other children. He was infatuated by Hitler. He talked about the things that Hitler was doing and how they could be applied in Afghanistan. Now that he is older being part of the Taliban allow him to act like Hitler and inflict pain upon so many people.

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    3. I couldn't see this coming specifically but I knew that Assef's role in this book wasn't over. Earlier in the book Assef made a comment stating that he promised he would get both Hassan and Amir back one day. In a tale of unfortunate events Hassan was killed by the Taliban and Assef could have had something to do with it. Based on context clues and foreshadowing it led me to assume that sooner or later Amir would be next to get what he deserved.

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  36. Do you think that Sohrab was scarred from his experiences with Assef? Will that later on affect the book or others?

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    1. I think I can connect Sohrab being scared when this was happening because when Amir was watching Hassan get beat up, he was speechless ad scared out of his mind. I think this event will effect the story because when Amir saw Hassan almost in the same situation, it effect the rest of Amir/Hassan's life.

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    2. I think Sohrab is scarred from what he has experienced with Assef. He will most likely have a hard time trusting people. On page 300 it says "We sat there like that for a while, silent, me propped up in bed, two pillows behind my back, Sohrab on the three-legged stool next to the bed." This shows Sohrab isn't ready to open up to Amir even though Amir helped him out of Afghanistan and captivity. It will affect the book later on because it will change the development of a bond between Amir and Sohrab.

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    3. Yes I do think Soharb was scarred but not as badly as you may think. I think this because Soharb has had a hard life and has grown up struggle but I do think so of the things Assef did will stay with him for the rest of his life and he will struggle with it day in and day out. I think it not only would affect Soharb but others too because they are going to have to learn how to help move on and how to deal with what ever he went through.

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    4. I definitely believe Sohrab will feel bad about it, but he stood up for what he knew was right, so i think he might get over it eventually.

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  37. In previous chapters Amir says he doesn't want to forget anymore. At the bottom of page 303 Amir is looking at himself in the mirror. At this point do you think he wishes he could forget what has just happened?

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    1. No, I think that for once Amir finally feels relieved, like he finally got what he deserved. Ever since the thing with Hassan happened, Amir has felt guilty, and wishes he could get what he deserved, and I think that looking in the mirror and seeing how badly he got hurt is finally what Amir has been wanting to see for all these years.

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    2. From what the book explains how Amir feels I believe that Amir does not want to forget any longer even through this event. On page 289 when Assef is yelling "WHAT'S SO FUNNY" at Amir, all Amir is able to do is laugh. I think this showed a sign that Amir finally felt like he got what he deserved. All the pain caused on him left him at peace so he does not need to forget any longer because he is almost tied up to Hassan's pain.

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  38. When Sohrab shot Assef's eye out it was symbolic because in the beginning of the book when Assef cornered Amir and Hassan, Hassan's slingshot saved them. Although Hassan didn't have to use it at the time it shows the slingshot although not seen as a super powerful tool, when used right it can create enough destruction. This also shows Amir once again needed help to get out of a tricky situation.

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  39. On page 276, Assef is telling Amir how great of a person Assef thinks he is; do you think Assef genuinely thinks he's a good person, or is he just trying to get a rise out of Amir?

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  40. Amir will never be able to fully redeem himself for the things he did he might do things to weight out the bad but there will still be that feeling of regret and guilt i others eyes yes but in his eyes no. Going to get Soharb was a good start to make amends.

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  41. What is the significance of Amir retrieving Sohrab and getting beaten up rather than just getting him and leaving peacefully?

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    1. I think this makes him a hero because he saved him. Also he is kind of reliving the past with the memory of Hassan in the ally. If he had just walked away then there wouldn't really be any connection. Amir now knows how it feels to be beaten.

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    2. This adds a sense of conflict to the story. Amir would not have been seen as a hero if he did not have to struggle to retrieve Sohrab. The struggle is to develop Amir as a hero.

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    3. As said above, Amir would not have been seen as a hero without the fight. In each hero 's story, there is always a fight or a battle, and while Amir has had many different smaller battles, this was the biggest one. He still has more ahead of him, but this was the fight that made him become a hero, and stop being a coward. It helped him to find the bravery within himself.

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    4. i don't think he really had a choice because he said it would cost him a price, just as he said to hassan on page 72. this is kind of a resemblance because he chose to get beet like hassan insted of giving up the boy or kite

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  42. Also on page 301 in Rahim Khan's letter he says "Your father, like you, was a tortured soul..." does this change how Amir sees his father? If Amir is a mirror of Baba's tortured past, is Hassan the resemblance of the life he wished he lived?

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  43. On page 289, Amir starts laughing, but I feel like most people wouldn't exactly start laughing while being beat. Also, on 283, Assef had been telling about how he had started laughing while being beat. Why did Amir start laughing while being beat even after Assef told him he had done that? Deep down are they possibly almost the same?

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  44. On Page 296, Amir's near death experience is displayed through a fight and no one giving up on Amir or letting him die. Why do you think all the other deaths in this book have been so sudden and uncontrollable, when Amir's has been so controlled and taken longer? What does this represent?

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    1. I think part of it has to do with age. Amir is the narrator throughout this story, and when he is younger, I think it's harder for him to remember what happened, and it is not in as vivid detail. Also, when something happens to you, rather than someone else, you tend to remember it more precisely. I also feel that the rest of the deaths in the book hadn't really been a fight. Baba died of cancer, which is fighting against a disease, but we learned of that through chapters of the book and he died in his sleep. Hassan died but Amir was not there for that. Other deaths happened but none were as physical as Amir's.

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  45. Just curious, How many people think they know what is going to happen next?

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    1. I think Amir is going to take Sohrab back to America with him.

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  46. I think that Amir is kind of using Sorhab as a way to redeem himself from what he did to Hassan when they were children. I think that Amir is trying to pay respects to Hassan by taking in Sorhab. Sorhab and Hassan share many of the same qualities as eachother.. I think that Amir is reminded of his and Hassan's great friendship when is with Sorhab.

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  47. Has the Bravery of Amir made him more like his father Baba? Do you think he would still gain this bravery if Baba was stil alive? Would Baba be proud of him if he was Brave?

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    1. Amir might have, it depends on whether or not he would allow Baba to continue fighting his fights. If Amir chose to go through this struggle without Baba, then yes, he probably would have gained this bravery.

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    2. on page 295 he dreams about baba wrestling the bear., but when he looks at baba its not baba, it is him fighting the bear. i think this tells him that he was as brave as his father and went and fought the bear.

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  48. What is the point of having put makeup on Sohrab? He's a young boy, not a teenage girl. If Assef wanted to do bad things to him, why put makeup on him? Was it to make him look nicer? Or was it something else?

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    1. I think it was just another way for Assef to humiliate him and re establish the power he had over him. Along with the way he dressed him, he was sort of "completing the look" in a way, and I think he was just adding more to show his power and authority.

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  49. I think that Farid's view of Amir has changed as he has seen Amir's devotion to find Sohrab and give Sohrab a good life. I think he is starting to respect Amir and see that he isn't some shallow rich boy who is doing this just for himself.

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  50. I think that Sorhab deserves the "hero" title more than Amir because he is more brave and loyal than Amir ever will be.

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    1. I agree with you because this kind of ties back to the incident in the alley and how Amir didn't help Hassan. But when Amir needed help, Sohrab helped him which i think Sohrab is the hero because he was able to have the guts to help out and fight.

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    2. I do not agree with this. I feel as we finish the book we will see Amir being more of a hero figure than we see now. I just can not see Sorhab being a hero.

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  51. Can Amir ever find forgiveness for himself from his childhood mistakes? I think that Amir was put in a very hard position at a young age. I Amir needs to understand that ya he messed up but he need to let go and move on. Amir will always feel pain for what he has done when he thinks about it but he should come to the understanding that anyone could have made the same mistake.

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    1. I think Amir found forgiveness from himself by getting beat up by Assef. He finally feels like he got what he deserves, and he feels relieved. He also finds forgiveness by reading Rahim's letter, and knows that it was a long time ago; he needs to forget.

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  52. I found it interesting that Hassan had told Rahim Khan what had happened in the alley shortly after it happened, and not in the years later when they were living together. I didn't know they were that close. Do you think that Rahim Khan was as much of a father figure or friend to Hassan as he was to Amir, or was this just something that happened rarely?

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    1. I think Rahim Khan was a father figure to both Amir and Hassan, because he knew they were brothers, and I think being kind to both of them was kind of his way of making up for not telling them the truth.

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  53. On page 306, Amir and Sohrab are playing a cared game called Panjpar. Does anyone know what this is or what kind of card game its like?

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  54. Do you think Amir seeing Hassan's son bring back a lot of memories for him and Hassan? Do you think it's bad memories or good ones?

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    1. I think that every time Amir sees Sohrab he is going to be reminded of Hassan because they look so much alike and everything else. I also think that the memories he brings back will just be memories, some good some bad some random some having no good or bad title just a simple memory. So I don't think he'll bring back either good or bad memories, just memories.

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  55. How do you think Amir felt when he found out that Rahim Khan died? How do you think Amir felt knowing the last person from his childhood is now gone? How do you think this is going to Impact Amir in the next couple of chapters?

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    1. I think that Amir sees this as his time to finally do what is right. Hassan sacrificed so much for Amir and Amir always took it for granted. But now Amir wants to do something good in return for all the good deeds Hassan did for Amir while they were growing up.

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  56. Why do you think Baba struggled to tell Hassan and Amir the truth? Does he regret treating Amir differently than Hassan?

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  57. On page 288 Amir said "...how cold they felt with the first few blows and how quickly they warmed with my blood." What is the significance of this quote? Why did we need to read this?

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  58. At this point in the book, Amir is considered a "hero". What are some characteristics that set him under that "hero" category?

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    1. Amir tries to protect people as best he can. but heroes always have a weakness. Amir's is just putting himself out there.

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  59. How does Assefs story about how he became part of the Taliban on page 283 affect how he treated the people of Afghanistan and Amir?

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    1. In his story he was taken and beaten for simply being alive, that showed Assef that anything bad that someone did could be punished severely and Assef was always a cruel, psychotic boy but the experience of his prison time just added to his insanity.

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  60. On Page 294 Amir is struggling to live and continues to repeat "I fade out". What is the symbolism and or representation of this?

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  61. Hassan in my opinion most likely went to Rahim Khan to tell him what happened in the alley because he knew how much of a father figure he was to Amir and therefore a less connected link that could be told without any worry of the secret escaping

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  62. On page 310 Amir thinks back and then he says a way to be good again. I think when he says this it shows that Amir wants more than anything to be a good man. He wants to make something of himself that he didn't before.

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  63. On page 301 in Rahim's letter to Amir it says "Amir jan, I know how hard your father was on you when you were growing up. I saw how you suffered and yearned for his affections, and my heart bled for you. But your father was a man torn between two halves, Amir jan: you and Hassan." What do you think is so significant about this quote? Do you think it makes sense to Amir now why Baba was so grumpy all the time?

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    1. It is significant that it was so hard for Baba to love two kids without showing it to one. I think it does make sense why Baba was so grumpy all the time because all he wanted to do was to treat Amir and Hassan with all love, when he had to only show it to Amir. It also shows how Baba treated them equally with giving them the same stuff.

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  64. Through out this book we have heard a lot about all of the good things Baba has done. Was Baba just someone who loved to good things for others or did something happen to Baba in his childhood giving him a reason to do the good works ?

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  65. On page 287, right before Assef is going to fight Amir, he pulls out his brass knuckles, the same weapon he used as a kid. What do you think the significance of this is?

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    1. It brings back the memories and shows that Assef is still a bad person and he hasn't changed. He is still stuck in his violent ways.

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    2. I think this is a symbol of Assef because it represents what people think of Assef. A tough. hard, and cold person. It shows the true colors of Assef .

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    3. I think that it's just something else that Assef was using to torment Amir along with like being all creepy and sexual with Sohrab, because the brass knuckles were used so much to hurt Amir and Hassan and every one else as children the brass knuckles coming back out are just Assef trying to assert his dominance over Amir once again.

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  66. I don't think Assef will be able to find them again. We left him in a poor condition and he is in no place to return. The people he works with may come looking for them but as long as Amir leaves the country I don't think they will cross paths again.

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  67. Was Sohrab maybe afraid at first that Amir was just going to take him away to do even more bad thing? Until he realized that Amir would even fight for him, but I mean, maybe that was his very first assumption.

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  68. Do Amir's actions in the last couple chapters resemble any form of redemption to other or is it just Amir who feels satisfied? Does the dream that Amir has about the bear fight resemble how he feels cleansed now?

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  69. On page 302 in Rahim's letter to Amir it says "I have little time left and I wish to spend it alone. Please do not look for me. That is my final request of you."
    Why does Rahim not want to spend the rest of his time alive with people, but instead alone?

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  70. When Rahim Khan says on page 301 "A man with no conscience, no goodness, does not suffer." does this mean that suffering is a part of a good life?

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